50+ Job Descriptions to Attract Top Talent (+ Free Downloadable Template)

Claire Brenner
Claire Brenner  |  September 20, 2018

There’s nothing quite as exciting as finally getting approved to hire that desperately needed employee.

While wearing a lot of different hats in a single role is certainly exciting (no two days are ever the same!), it’s also exhausting – and even that may be an understatement. If your team is clearly strapped for time and resources, it may be time to bring in some reinforcements.

Unfortunately, the process of getting headcount approved to hire can be a time-consuming one. You’ll need to justify your need for a new employee (or more than one!), define their roles, and estimate the impact they can have on your company goals. And once you get the go-ahead to start hiring, the hard work doesn’t stop.

The first thing on your to-do list should be writing your job description. This means determining the title of the role, coming up with your comprehensive list of responsibilities and requirements, and much more.

If you’re already strapped for resources as it is, you’ll want to start getting those resumes and cover letters in as soon as possible. What we’re really saying is this: the sooner that job description is written, the better.

Unfortunately, we can’t always rely on our human resources or recruiting team to write our job descriptions for us. You’ll have the best understanding of your team’s unique needs and the qualifications that will set a candidate apart from the rest of the pool.

That said, writing a job description can still be, well, hard – especially if it’s your first time hiring a new employee.

We want to make it easier.

That’s why we’ve created this comprehensive resource. We’ve included the structure of a job description, a free downloadable template, examples of job descriptions covering a variety of roles, levels of experience, departments, and much more!

Feel free to use the below job descriptions as a starting place, and then adapt them to your specific company, the role itself, and your desired requirements & necessary responsibilities. You can use the menu below to jump ahead to the department you’re looking for – and if it’s not a link quite yet, don’t worry – it’s coming soon!

Job Descriptions

Use the links below to find job description samples based on department. If the link isn't live yet, don't worry – it's coming soon!

But first, we’ll cover the structure of a typical job description, including our quick and easy downloadable template.

Structure of a job description: What to Include and Why

A quality job description will include the following sections. 

Title

Okay, this one shouldn’t come as a big surprise – the title of the role should be the first thing listed in your job description. Here’s why: your title should do a good job of implying what the role does (marketing, recruiting, customer success, etc.) and whether the role is entry-level, mid-level, or senior-level, based on your choice of keyword (associate, specialist, manager, director, vice president, etc.) This will simplify the life of your job seeker (an entry-level candidate likely won’t waste their time reading a job description for a VP, and vice versa).

In recent years, companies have started to replace traditional titles with whimsical jargon like “marketing guru” or “sales rockstar”. Please, do not do this. At its best, it will confuse potential candidates, and at its worst, it could deter serious professionals from applying.

While it may seem like you, the person seeking a new employee, have the power in this situation, you should try to abandon that thought process as much as possible. You want to sell your candidate on your company as much as much as they want to sell you on their professional experience. This means their experience with your company, from the first time they see your job description to the time they sign the offer letter, has to be as seamless as possible.

At the end of the day, always remember: your hiring process is a reflection of your brand.

Job Location

A quality job description will have the location of the role, not your company’s headquarters (unless they’re one in the same), in an obvious place right at the top. If you’re an organization with offices all over the country (or world!), this will help potential candidates avoid any possible confusion.

If the job is remote, you’ll want to mention that as well. For somebody who loves working in a physical office, they may be disappointed to learn that a role is actually remote later on in the interview process. On the other hand, specifying this now may attract potential candidates who are excited about the idea of working from anywhere and everywhere.

Company Description

Now that we’ve gotten the title and location out of the way, you’re at your first real section. Typically, these first two sections are in paragraph form. Section 1 is your company description or, as they say in the world of public relations, your “boilerplate.” While it shouldn’t be much longer than four-to-six sentences, it should still briefly explain what your company does and why.

This company description can also start to hint at why your potential candidates may want to work there (you know, like a humble brag!) However, if your organization prides itself on its stellar culture, then consider making that a section of its own.

For the most part, this section can remain similar (if not identical) across all of your job descriptions. However, it’s not always easy to brag about yourself (or your company, in this case). To help you out, we’ve provided a few templates for this section depending on your intended tone (professional, fun, etc.)

Examples in Job Listings

Here are three examples* of companies that have leveraged this section to establish itself as an exciting, innovative, or plain old fun place to work.

Lululemon

Yoga is our first love, and we also make a technical product for running, training and pretty much every other way you like to sweat. You can find our stores all around the world, from Vancouver to Dubai, and places in between. Our vision is to create transformational experiences for people to live happy, healthy, fun lives and our mission is to elevate the world through the power of practice.

Delta Airlines

At Delta, we move the people who move the world. With an industry-leading global network, Delta Air Lines and Delta Connection carriers offer service to 306 destinations in 52 countries on six continents. Recognized as the best in the business, our Flight Attendants touch the lives of our 180 million annual customers every day. Keep climbing and join us today with a career as a Flight Attendant.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn was built to help professionals achieve more in their careers, and every day millions of people use our products to make connections, discover opportunities and gain insights. Our global reach means we get to make a direct impact on the world’s workforce in ways no other company can. We’re much more than a digital resume – we transform lives through innovative products and technology.

Searching for your dream job? At LinkedIn, we strive to help our employees find passion and purpose. Join us in changing the way the world works.

 *Examples selected from GlassDoor’s Best Places to Work List | 2018

 

Role Overview

Arguably one of the most important aspects of your job description, your second section is the role overview. This will be the first time you introduce the potential candidate to the open role, the team they’d be working on, to whom they would be reporting, and the position’s high-level responsibilities and objectives. You can also use this section to touch on their desired levels of expertise and experience.

This section, while unique to each particular department and role, can easily stem from a company-wide template so that the role overviews remain consistent across your organization.

For example, we’ve provided the below template that could cater to a variety of roles throughout your company.

[Your company name] is looking to hire a [position title] to oversee [high-level tasks and responsibilities] of [department and function] efforts. This individual should have a successful track record of [high-level achievements]. The ideal candidate has significant expertise in [high-level requirements] and is [desired characteristics and attributes].

Now, let’s say your marketing team is looking to hire a social media marketing manager. Based off of the template, the role overview may look something like this:

ACME Corporation is looking to hire a Social Media Marketing Manager to oversee strategic planning and execution of the marketing departments social media efforts. This individual should have a successful track record of content management, generating inbound and social traffic, and cultivating marketing-qualified leads. The ideal candidate has significant expertise in paid social media advertising and is creative, highly motivated, and self-directed.

 Using a template for your role overviews will not only increase consistency throughout your organization but also save you time while writing your job descriptions (and we’re all about time management and productivity over here).

Responsibilities

In the third section, you’ll use bullet points to provide additional details and information, and ultimately, expand upon the role overview. When writing these bullet points, you’ll need to really dive into both the day-to-day and long-term responsibilities of the potential new hire. It should highlight the key tasks that will need to be completed on a daily, weekly, monthly, or annually basis.

Upon reading this list, a potential candidate should have a well-informed idea of their ability (or lack thereof) to succeed in this role, based on former positions and experiences.

Typically, I’d advise against using jargon in almost all forms of business writing. However, when it comes to job descriptions, I’ll make an exception (but just this once!) When writing the role’s responsibilities, I’d actually encourage you to use terminology appropriate to both the primary function of the role and your desired level of experience. Not only will this ensure that the language you use accurately matches the role, but it’ll also give the job seeker a better idea of whether or not their experience is appropriate for this level of work.

To continue with the social media marketing manager job description, we’ve provided an example of potential responsibilities below. Take note of the role-specific jargon used and how it offers a deeper understanding of the role.

Responsibilities for this Job
  • Conduct and analyze research on benchmark trends and audience preferences
  • Execute targeted campaigns intended to grow brand awareness and optimize traffic to our website
  • Write and edit social media marketing copy
  • Stay up-to-date with new features and trends on various social media platforms, including (but not limited to) Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn
  • Carry out methods for content syndication and lead generation
  • Maintain positive brand experience for all social media audiences
  • Measure and report on the impact of social media strategies 

You’ll note that these are the responsibilities of the current role, and not related to what your potential candidate may have achieved in his or her previous roles. That’s where your requirements come in, which brings us to section four. 

Requirements

Also included as a bulleted list, your requirements (also known as your necessary qualifications) outline your desired and necessary skills for this position (note: these aren’t necessarily the same thing). In addition to things like level of education, years of experience, and certifications or proficiencies, your list may include soft skills and characteristics, such as a “can-do attitude” or an “entrepreneurial spirit.”

While it may seem straightforward, this section can get especially tricky (and even a bit ambiguous). We’ve all read a job description that seemed like a perfect fit, only to scroll down to the requirements section and… wait – you’re telling me I need a minimum of five years industry experience for a summer internship?

Okay, that may be a bit of an exaggeration, but hopefully, you get my point.

When determining your required level of education and years of experience, sit down and really think it through. While you may think you’ll only be getting the best of the best by overstating this, you’re actually only hurting yourself – and more than likely, deterring some stellar potential candidates from submitting an application. Keep in mind that years of experience don’t always equate to knowledge.

No, we’re not saying to hire just anybody. But when you’re determining these hard requirements, consider sitting down with other managers in your organization or looking at similar roles to come up with a reasonable level of experience required.

The following example features the requirements list for a social media marketing manager that includes a mix of hard skills, soft skills, absolute needs, and “nice-to-haves”.

Requirements for this Job
  • You have 2+ years of social media management experience and 1+ year of marketing experience
  • You have a bachelor’s degree, preferably in marketing, communications, or English
  • You are skilled in using social media management and social media monitoring software tools
  • You have experience with search marketing, paid social media advertising, and writing marketing copy
  • You are creative, self-motivated, and pay close attention to detail
  • You possess a deep understanding of various social media platforms, including but not limited to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn
  • You have strong verbal and written communication skills
  • The ideal candidate would be Google Analytics certified and have basic HTML experience

You’ll notice we phrased a few bullet points as hard requirements (you have _____, you are skilled in _____, etc.), and left a few as nice-to-haves – something that isn’t entirely necessary but would set a candidate out from the rest.

We also included soft-skills among the mix, including creativity and motivation, plus an eye for detail.

Soft-skills may seem subjective and ambiguous, but they’re especially important. Soft skills typically equate to things that can’t be taught (or maybe they can, but only to an extent) – things like creativity, charisma, leadership, and motivation. While you may not be able to learn this from a resume (unless it’s chock full of buzzwords), they can be a key indicator of whether or not a candidate will be successful.

Why they may want to work with you (also known as perks)

Now, we’ve gotten to the fun part. That’s right – you get to brag about your company, your employees, and those perks your friends are so jealous of. This section can be in either bullet points or paragraph form, and, similar to section one, should remain consistent across all of your organization’s job descriptions.

When writing this section, try not to go overboard on listing off perks the likes of which you’d see in HBO’s comedy series Silicon Valley. While you can certainly mention your catered lunch, flexible work-from-home policy, or in-office massages, try to focus more heavily on the things people are really looking for (yup – even millennials). Think things like professional development, visionary leadership, and empowerment.

Consider the following example, which features some exciting “perks,” but primarily discusses the company’s progressive culture and exciting growth.

Some reasons why you might like us:

Here at ACME Corporations, we wanted to create a place where people would love to work – and we do this with more than just free lunch and flexible vacation (although we offer those, too!) We pride ourselves on having an environment that rewards collaboration and ingenuity. While you’ll receive a competitive salary and a full benefits package, you’ll also join a rapidly growing company that works together, learns together, and plays together.

 So, put all of these sections together, and it might look a little something like this:

Title: Social Media Marketing Manager

Location: Chicago

With more than 400 percent growth since 2015, ACME Corporations is North America’s leading energy provider, with the single largest retail customer base nationwide. Since its founding in 2007, ACME Corporations has strived to meet the highest standards of energy delivery, customer service, and cost efficiency. Our mission is to be the top-tier energy provider while fostering a collaborative, diverse, and inclusive workplace.

ACME Corporation is looking to hire a Social Media Marketing Manager to oversee strategic planning and execution of the marketing departments social media efforts. This individual should have a successful track record of content management, generating inbound and social traffic, and cultivating marketing-qualified leads. The ideal candidate has significant expertise in paid social media advertising and is creative, highly motivated, and self-directed.

Responsibilities:

  • Conduct and analyze research on benchmark trends and audience preferences
  • Execute targeted campaigns intended to grow brand awareness and optimize traffic to our website
  • Write and edit social media marketing copy
  • Measure and report on the impact of social media strategies
  • Stay up-to-date with new features and trends on various social media platforms, including (but not limited to) Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn
  • Carry out methods for content syndication and lead generation
  • Maintain positive brand experience for all social media audiences

Requirements:

  • You have 2+ years of social media management experience and 1+ year of marketing experience
  • You have a bachelor’s degree, preferably in marketing, communications, or English
  • You possess a deep understanding of various social media platforms, including but not limited to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn
  • You are skilled in using social media management and social media monitoring software tools
  • You have experience with search marketing, paid social media advertising, and writing marketing copy
  • You are creative, self-motivated, and pay close attention to detail
  • You have strong verbal and written communication skills
  • The ideal candidate would be Google Analytics certified and have basic HTML experience

Some reasons why you might like us:

Here at ACME Corporations, we wanted to create a place where people would love to work – and we do this with more than just free lunch and flexible vacation (although we offer those, too!) We pride ourselves on having an environment that rewards collaboration and ingenuity. While you’ll receive a competitive salary and a full benefits package, you’ll also join a rapidly growing company that works together, learns together, and plays together.

Job Description Template

For a more general job description, consider copy and pasting the following text, or downloading our template below:

Title:

Location:

Company Description: Here, you’ll put a brief company description. In this, you’ll want to include your industry, your product(s) or service(s), and your company mission – basically, what you do and why. Including your company mission and vision can help your organization appeal to potential candidates – remember, you’re selling them as much as they’re selling you! Consider including relevant numbers, like percent growth, revenue, etc.

Role Overview: Here, provide a brief description of the role and how it fits into your organization as a whole. You can include who they would report to, who would report to them, what success in the position looks like, and a high-level description of the role’s key responsibilities.

Responsibilities:

  • List their primary responsibilities in order of importance
  • Start sentences with verbs and use the present tense
  • Always use gender-neutral language
  • Tasks listed should cover the position’s high-level and regular responsibilities as opposed to random day-to-day tasks that come up
  • Unless it’s an executive role, try to stick to between five and eight bullet points

Requirements:

  • Level of education (if applicable)
  • Years of experience
  • Technical skills (experience with software products, knowledge of tools, etc.)
  • Soft skills (ie: personal characteristics – highly motivated, creative, etc.)
  • Physical abilities (if applicable)
  • Necessary certifications or licenses
  • The “nice-to-haves” – if there are skills an ideal candidate would have, include them in your last bullet point

Why they may like you: In this section, you’ll include some reasons why the candidate may like working with YOU! Use typical perks sparingly (free lunch, vacation time, etc.) and instead, try to focus on the big-picture features like visionary leadership and company culture.

To download this free template in a Microsoft Word document, click here:

Download Job Description Template

 

Keep checking back

We’ll continue adding more job descriptions, best practices, downloadable templates, and more! Keep checking back to make sure you’re up-to-date on this comprehensive resource. 

Claire Brenner
Author

Claire Brenner

Claire is a senior content marketing specialist who came to G2 Crowd after graduating from the University of Dayton with a BA in Communication. Born and raised in the Chicago area, her brief stint in Ohio gave her a new appreciation for deep-dish pizza, but left her well-versed in Cincinnati-style chili and "cities" with a population fewer than 400,000. While not writing, Claire can be found practicing calligraphy and planning her next trip.